No mowing allowed – Support organic habitat

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(Beyond PesticidesMay 2, 2022) Occupy lawns 40 million hectares, or 2% of the land in the US. Their maintenance typically involves pesticides and fertilizers that kill pollinators and soil life and are washed into streams where they do more damage. Lawn care also includes a lot of mowing. While mowing is an effective way to promote grasses over most deciduous plants, it also has wider ecological implications.

The 3,600 bee species in the US and Canada range from large bumblebees to tiny sweat bees. There are many things you can do in your garden and community to protect these bees – starting with Manage lawns and landscapes ecologically and planting flowers favored by bees and other pollinators. This-No mowing May-requires fewer Work.

Join No Mow May. Manage your landscape organically. Plant flowers for pollinators. Send a message to your mayor.

No Mow May started researching plant world in the UK and was acquired by property owners in Appleton, WI who shown that “Homes that participated in No Mow May had more diverse and lush flora than regularly mowed green spaces across the city.”

May is the month when many bees in the US emerge from hibernation and look for sources of pollen and nectar. By letting your lawn grow in May, more flowering plants will bloom and feed the bees and other pollinators. The longer grass also provides a more varied habitat for ground beetles and some butterflies. However, mowing can be advisable if ticks are a problem (mow paths!) or ground-nesting bees are present.

One obstacle many people encounter when taking a break from mowing is that some communities have weed ordinances that prohibit tall vegetation. After years of fines for growing his weed on his Prairie Street property, Michael Almon of Lawrence, KS worked with the Lawrence Sustainability Advisory Board to design a new one Natural Landscape Building Code to replace the old weed regulation. See Beyond Pesticides’ Tools for Change for help changing your city’s obsolete ordinance.

Join No Mow May. Manage your landscape organically. Plant flowers for pollinators. Send a message to your mayor.

Letter to the Mayors:

Lawns occupy 40 million acres or 2% of the land in the US. Their care typically involves pesticides and fertilizers that kill pollinators and soil creatures and are washed into streams where they do more damage. Lawn care also includes a lot of mowing. While mowing is an effective way to promote grasses over most deciduous plants, it also has wider ecological implications.

The 3,600 bee species in the US and Canada range from large bumblebees to tiny sweat bees. There are many things we can do in our gardening community to protect these bees – starting with managing lawns and landscapes organically and planting flowers that bees and other pollinators prefer. But one thing – No Mow May – requires fewer Work.

No Mow May began research by Plantlife in the UK and was picked up by property owners in Appleton, WI, who showed that “Homes that participated in No Mow May had more diverse and lush flora than regularly mowed green spaces across the city .”

May is the month when many bees in the US emerge from hibernation and look for sources of pollen and nectar. By letting our lawn grow in May, more flowering plants will bloom and feed the bees and other pollinators. The longer grass also provides a more varied habitat for ground beetles and some butterflies. However, mowing can be advisable if ticks are a problem (mow paths!) or ground-nesting bees are present.

One obstacle many people encounter when taking a break from mowing is that some communities have weed ordinances that prohibit tall vegetation. Fortunately, many communities are now taking a more enlightened approach. Please let me know if our city promotes habitat for pollinators.

Thanks.

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